005: The Very Best Way You Can Support your Child in School // Amanda Hamilton Roos of Building the Bridge

The Very Best Way to Support Your Child in School
Listen to this episode

Is your child’s life at school a bit of a mystery to you? Whenever you ask what he/she did today, do you hear the lackluster response, “Oh, nothing.”

Amanda Hamilton Roos taught high school English for nearly a decade before deciding to stay home with her three children. She has continued to be very involved in education by writing curriculum and developing a website called BuildingtheBridge.org. Her mission is to help families bridge the divide between home and school and build strong, effective partnerships.

In today’s podcast, she shares three easy steps for forming a “working relationship” with your child’s teacher.  Within the discussion, you will learn…

  • Why talking to your child’s teacher about something other than school is so important
  • How to start these conversations without sounding like an awkward teenager on a blind date
  • How often you should “follow up” with teachers and in what ways
  • Why a little praise and gratitude goes a long way
  • What you should be asking to see within the classroom

Show Notes

Amanda’s website for families and teachers: BuildingtheBridge.org

Beyond the Bakesale: The Essential Guide to Family and School Partnerships by Anne Hendersen

Amanda Hamilton Roos Quote II 3 in 30 Takeaways for Moms

About the Podcast Host, Rachel Nielson

Rachel taught high school English for five years before deciding to be a stay-at-home mom to her two miracle babies, Noah Atticus, who was adopted, and Sally Grace, who was conceived through IVF.

In her life, Rachel has experienced great sorrow but also great joy--and she loves diving deep into the topics that matter most. Thank you for listening to the podcast and giving her a chance to share her heart.

1 Comment

  1. Kary Clark on 03/28/2018 at 5:37 AM

    As a teacher, I find that often the parents whom I have the best relationships with/the parents who show up to Parents’ Night tend to be the ones whose children are more dedicated students. Obviously there are exceptions, but my experience does follow what I just listened to, to a degree.

    Now, as a parent, I’m trying to foster relationships with my child’s teacher as well, so thank you for suggestions of how to do that!

Leave a Comment