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143: Healing Emotionally after a Traumatic Birth // Mia Hemstad

Rachel Nielson, host of Top Motherhood Podcast, 3 in 30 Takeaways for Moms, with Mia Hemstead, How to Heal after Birth Trauma | Traumatic Birth by popular US mom podcast, 3 in 30 mom podcast: image of Mia Hemstead.

Pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum are incredibly vulnerable times of life. During these seasons, your body is not fully your own, and it can feel disorienting. Especially if you’ve ever experienced a traumatic birth.

Yet we often only hear stories about how beautiful this time is, and when our experience doesn’t match up with what we expected, we can feel guilt, shame, anger, and resentment.

Today we have a guest on the show who is passionate about talking about the tough and unexpected stuff in motherhood. Mia Hemstad is a mental health advocate, a political activist, and mother of two little ones who are four and two years old. She is also the founder of No Longer Last, a community of women who are on a journey to do one small thing every day to nourish themselves. 

As part of her mission to encourage women to care for themselves, Mia decided to share her traumatic birth experience in a powerful article she wrote was picked up by Parents.com, Yahoo, Kids Spot, Cafe Mom, and several other media outlets. The article has helped thousands of women all over the world to move forward after traumatic birth experiences and learn how to advocate for themselves and their wellness in the future.

I’m so grateful for her bravery in talking about this very important and not-discussed-enough topic, and I know you are going to love this conversation that I had with her.

Three Takeaways for Healing Emotionally after a Traumatic Birth

  1. Accept that your birth was traumatic, and it was not your fault. Talk to compassionate friends or family about your experience and if necessary, seek counseling support to process what you went through and how your life is changing as a mom to a new baby.
  2. Don’t be afraid to ask tough questions of your medical professionals and speak up about what you want and need. (ex: What’s your stance on medical intervention and C-sections? Do you screen for depression and anxiety during pregnancy?)
  3. Trust your intuition and act on it. If you need support acting on your intuition, reach out to someone on your support team and ask for it.

Show Notes

Mia’s article about her traumatic birth

Mia’s Website

Mia’s Program “No Longer Last”

Mia’s Instagram

Mia’s Facebook

Mia’s YouTube Channel

BetterHelp Online Therapy: betterhelp.com/3in30

>>>>Receive an email recap of ALL of the takeaways from the month: 3in30podcast.com/takeaways.<<<

Related Episodes

Episode 107: Surviving Depression in Motherhood // Sarah McKenna

Episode 108: How to Get Help for Mental Illness // Sarah McKenna

Episode 060: 3 Facts about Infant Sleep You MUST Know // Dr. Katie Penry

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Have you experienced a traumatic birth or know someone who has? What did you do to help things feel better? Let me know in a comment below!

About the Podcast Host, Rachel Nielson

Rachel taught high school English for five years before deciding to be a stay-at-home mom to her two miracle babies, Noah Atticus, who was adopted, and Sally Grace, who was conceived through IVF.

In her life, Rachel has experienced great sorrow but also great joy--and she loves diving deep into the topics that matter most. Thank you for listening to the podcast and giving her a chance to share her heart.

2 Comments

  1. Dianne on 08/17/2020 at 6:16 PM

    I gave birth to my children over 30 years ago. I suffered postpartum depression after my first child. I had no support. I wish it knew I could advocate for myself. I know you are going to be a blessing to so many new mothers.

    • Rachel Nielson on 08/19/2020 at 9:54 PM

      Oh wow. Thank you so much, Dianne! I’m so sorry you didn’t have that support. We are so fortunate to live in a time when depression is not so stigmatized. Thank you so much for listening!!

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